Enter now!
Colchester Treasure huning & Metal Detecting   Garrett Metal Detectors

Middlesex Detector Sales

Anderson Detector Shafts  X-treme

Minelab - Radioworld

GPS Central   White's Metal Detectors

SMI Electronics

The Ring Finders Metal Detecting Service    Radioworld Central

Forscore

Makrodetector.com

Recent Forum Posts

Topic: Seaforth Highlanders Canada

New Post by Mikerosy on Tue Jan 16, 2018 6:02 pm

P.S. Great write up Micheal for those who don't know Canada's military involvement and leadership in world peace.

Topic: Seaforth Highlanders Canada

New Post by Mikerosy on Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:58 pm

Very, very, cool finds. Those pieces are screaming history and remind us of those who paid the ultimate price and made our great country strong and free! Congrats on the great score!

Topic: Seaforth Highlanders Canada

New Post by Micheal on Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:33 pm

Oh man I love those pieces... beautiful!!! :tu: :wow:

A little history.. I suspect that your finds are WW1.. so i will concentrate the history on that time.. They have a long and storied history.

"The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada was first established on November 24, 1910 by a group of Vancouverites of Scottish descent. Upon official affiliation with the Seaforth Highlanders of the British Imperial Army, the "72nd Highlanders of Canada" was redesignated the "72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on April 15, 1912 and the "72nd Regiment Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on December 16, 1912. The Regiment received its first stand of colours from the Governor-General, HRH the Duke of Connaught, in 1912

At the outbreak of World War 1, the eager young Regiment offered itself for overseas service. The offer was refused until 1916; a total of 41 officers and 1,637 other ranks were drafted to other Canadian infantry units, in particular the 16th Battalion CEF. The Regiment perpetuated the 72nd Battalion which would later be attached to the 12th Brigade, 4th Canadian Division, and the 231st Battalion, which provided reinforcements for the Canadian Corps in the field.

In 1916, however, the Regiment sailed for France as the 72nd Battalion CEF, and very soon Seaforths were committed to battle. The 72nd quickly gained a reputation among friend and foe for its professional conduct, and particularly, for patrolling and aggressive trench raids.

The Regiment paid a heavy cost in blood during its numerous actions in the war. At Vimy Ridge, the 72nd helped spearhead the attack that won Canadian troops their reputation as the finest shock troops on the Allied side - but after the battle, only 11 officers and 62 men remained. The battle of Passchendaele saw the Regiment advance, before dawn, up a gully waist deep in mud in the pouring rain to capture its objective - which British generals had assessed as requiring a full Division of 15,000 soldiers.

When the veterans returned to Vancouver they brought with them sixteen battle honours. This recognition of courage did nothing to dispel the fact that, of the 3,791 officers and men who served as Seaforths during the war, 2,515 of them became casualties.

The Regiment received its second stand of colours from Lt. Gen Sir Arthur Currie on April 1, 1919. Redesignated "The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada" on September 15, 1920, the Regiment forged ahead in efficiency during the inter-war period and was selected to become a part of the 1st Canadian Division. Upon the start of the Second World War, the Regiment was mobilized as "The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, C.A.S.F." and embarked for the United Kingdom on the December 22, 1939.

In 1916, however, the Regiment sailed for France as the 72nd Battalion CEF, and very soon Seaforths were committed to battle. The 72nd quickly gained a reputation among friend and foe for its professional conduct, and particularly, for patrolling and aggressive trench raids.

The Regiment paid a heavy cost in blood during its numerous actions in the war. At Vimy Ridge, the 72nd helped spearhead the attack that won Canadian troops their reputation as the finest shock troops on the Allied side – but after the battle, only 11 officers and 62 men remained. The battle of Passchendaele saw the Regiment advance, before dawn, up a gully waist deep in mud in the pouring rain to capture its objective – which British generals had assessed as requiring a full Division of 15,000 soldiers.

When the veterans returned to Vancouver they brought with them sixteen battle honours. This recognition of courage did nothing to dispel the fact that, of the 3,791 officers and men who served as Seaforths during the war, 2,515 of them became casualties.

The Regiment received its second stand of colours from Lt. Gen Sir Arthur Currie on April 1, 1919. Redesignated “The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada” on September 15, 1920, the Regiment forged ahead in efficiency during the inter-war period and was selected to become a part of the 1st Canadian Division. Upon the start of the Second World War, the Regiment was mobilized as “The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, C.A.S.F.” and embarked for the United Kingdom on the December 22, 1939."

Micheal

Topic: Second run with the HF coil on the Deus.

New Post by 2ndoldman on Tue Jan 16, 2018 5:05 pm

I am happy that you enjoyed your recon trip to the lake Micheal. :tu:

Topic: Two cool finds from Dominican Republic.

New Post by lonely wolf on Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:58 pm

Historyman wrote:Very nice cross Vladimir
You find so many religious items.

Thanks Tony! Yup - I am not complaining :lmfao:

Topic: Second run with the HF coil on the Deus.

New Post by Bill from Lachine on Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:46 pm

Micheal,

Looking forward to see what the new coil sniffs out when the lake drops further.

Regards + HH

Bill

Topic: Two cool finds from Dominican Republic.

New Post by Historyman on Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:24 pm

Very nice cross Vladimir
You find so many religious items.